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Review of Subaxial Cervical Spine Injuries Presenting to a Tertiary-Level Hospital in Nepal: Challenges in Surgical Management in a Third World Scenario.

TitleReview of Subaxial Cervical Spine Injuries Presenting to a Tertiary-Level Hospital in Nepal: Challenges in Surgical Management in a Third World Scenario.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsDhakal GRaj, Bhandari R, Dhungana S, Poudel S, Gurung G, Kawaguchi Y, K Riew D
JournalGlobal Spine J
Volume9
Issue7
Pagination713-716
Date Published2019 Oct
ISSN2192-5682
Abstract

Study Design: Epidemiological retrospective study.

Objective: To describe the demographics, timing to surgery, delay, short-term neurological recovery, and complications in surgically treated subaxial cervical trauma in a resource-constrained country.

Methods: Thirty consecutive subaxial cervical trauma patients presenting to a trauma hospital in Nepal between December 2015 and August 2017 were analyzed as a retrospective cohort. Patients were segregated into 4 groups based on the timing to surgery: within 2 days, 3 to 7 days, 8 to 30 days, and >31 days.

Results: There were 27 male and 3 female patients with mean age 40 years. Twenty-four sustained fall injury, and 27 patients were from outside Kathmandu. No patients were treated within the first 48 hours; only 9 were treated between 3 and 7 days, 16 between 8 and 30 days, and 5 a month later. Major delay was finance and operating room availability. Thirteen patients had a C6C7 involvement followed by C5C6 in 6 patients. Seven patients had complete neurological deficit while 18 patients had incomplete deficit. A total of 46.7% improved their neurology in 6 months. No neurological recovery was observed in complete deficit patients.

Conclusion: Seventy percent of our patients were treated longer than 1 week after injury, which would likely be considered unacceptable in most first world countries. As expected, the outcomes for many of these patients were far worse than reported in North American centers with early access to medical care and insurance. Despite this, nearly half of our patients improved neurologically following treatment; hence, surgery holds hope of some restoration of neurologic deficits.

DOI10.1177/2192568219833049
Alternate JournalGlobal Spine J
PubMed ID31552151
PubMed Central IDPMC6745644