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Slowing late infantile Batten disease by direct brain parenchymal administration of a rh.10 adeno-associated virus expressing .

TitleSlowing late infantile Batten disease by direct brain parenchymal administration of a rh.10 adeno-associated virus expressing .
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsSondhi D, Kaminsky SM, Hackett NR, Pagovich OE, Rosenberg JB, De BP, Chen A, Van de Graaf B, Mezey JG, Mammen GW, Mancenido D, Xu F, Kosofsky B, Yohay K, Worgall S, Kaner RJ, Souwedaine M, Greenwald BM, Kaplitt M, Dyke JP, Ballon DJ, Heier LA, Kiss S, Crystal RG
JournalSci Transl Med
Volume12
Issue572
Date Published2020 Dec 02
ISSN1946-6242
Abstract

Late infantile Batten disease (CLN2 disease) is an autosomal recessive, neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding tripeptidyl peptidase 1 (TPP1). We tested intraparenchymal delivery of AAVrh.10hCLN2, a nonhuman serotype rh.10 adeno-associated virus vector encoding human , in a nonrandomized trial consisting of two arms assessed over 18 months: AAVrh.10hCLN2-treated cohort of 8 children with mild to moderate disease and an untreated, Weill Cornell natural history cohort consisting of 12 children. The treated cohort was also compared to an untreated European natural history cohort of CLN2 disease. The vector was administered through six burr holes directly to 12 sites in the brain without immunosuppression. In an additional safety assessment under a separate protocol, five children with severe CLN2 disease were treated with AAVrh.10hCLN2. The therapy was associated with a variety of expected adverse events, none causing long-term disability. Induction of systemic anti-AAVrh.10 immunity was mild. After therapy, the treated cohort had a 1.3- to 2.6-fold increase in cerebral spinal fluid TPP1. There was a slower loss of gray matter volume in four of seven children by MRI and a 42.4 and 47.5% reduction in the rate of decline of motor and language function, compared to Weill Cornell natural history cohort ( < 0.04) and European natural history cohort ( < 0.0001), respectively. Intraparenchymal brain administration of AAVrh.10hCLN2 slowed the progression of disease in children with CLN2 disease. However, improvements in vector design and delivery strategies will be necessary to halt disease progression using gene therapy.

DOI10.1126/scitranslmed.abb5413
Alternate JournalSci Transl Med
PubMed ID33268510