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Tandem Microscopic Slalom Technique: The Use of 2 Microscopes Simultaneously Performing Unilateral Laminotomy for Bilateral Decompression in Multilevel Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

TitleTandem Microscopic Slalom Technique: The Use of 2 Microscopes Simultaneously Performing Unilateral Laminotomy for Bilateral Decompression in Multilevel Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsWipplinger C, Kim E, Lener S, Navarro-Ramirez R, Kirnaz S, R Hernandez N, Melcher C, Paolicelli M, Maryam F, Schmidt FAnna, Härtl R
JournalGlobal Spine J
Volume10
Issue2 Suppl
Pagination88S-93S
Date Published2020 Apr
ISSN2192-5682
Abstract

Study Design: Technical note, retrospective case series.

Objective: Lumbar stenosis can be effectively treated using tubular unilateral laminotomy for bilateral decompression (ULBD). For multilevel stenosis, a multilevel ULBD through separate, alternating crossover approaches has been described as the "slalom technique." To increase efficacy, we introduced this approach with 2 microscopes simultaneously.

Methods: We collected data on 13 patients, with multilevel lumbar stenosis, operated at our institution between 2015 and 2016 by the aforementioned technique. We assessed surgical time (ST), estimated blood loss (EBL), complications, and revision surgeries. Furthermore, we provide a stepwise instruction for performing the tandem microscopic slalom technique in a safe and efficient manner.

Results: The mean age of the patients was 68 ± 8 years. The ST per level was 68 ± 19 minutes with an EBL per level of 39 ± 30 mL. We had no intraoperative complications and none of our patients required a revision surgery during a mean follow-up of 12 months.

Conclusions: We have shown that this technique is feasible and can be performed safely for multisegmental lumbar spinal stenosis with minimal tissue trauma and low EBL. Furthermore, randomized controlled studies with a larger sample size may be necessary to drive any final conclusions.

DOI10.1177/2192568219871918
Alternate JournalGlobal Spine J
PubMed ID32528812
PubMed Central IDPMC7263332