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Esophageal Perforation Following Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

TitleEsophageal Perforation Following Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: Case Report and Review of the Literature.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsHershman SH, Kunkle WA, Kelly MP, Buchowski JM, Ray WZ, Bumpass DB, Gum JL, Peters CM, Singhatanadgige W, Kim JYoung, Smith ZA, Hsu WK, Nassr A, Currier BL, Rahman R'KK, Isaacs RE, Smith JS, Shaffrey C, Thompson SE, Wang JC, Lord EL, Buser Z, Arnold PM, Fehlings MG, Mroz TE, K Riew D
JournalGlobal Spine J
Volume7
Issue1 Suppl
Pagination28S-36S
Date Published2017 Apr
ISSN2192-5682
Abstract

STUDY DESIGN: Multicenter retrospective case series and review of the literature.

OBJECTIVE: To determine the rate of esophageal perforations following anterior cervical spine surgery.

METHODS: As part of an AOSpine series on rare complications, a retrospective cohort study was conducted among 21 high-volume surgical centers to identify esophageal perforations following anterior cervical spine surgery. Staff at each center abstracted data from patients' charts and created case report forms for each event identified. Case report forms were then sent to the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network Methodological Core for data processing and analysis.

RESULTS: The records of 9591 patients who underwent anterior cervical spine surgery were reviewed. Two (0.02%) were found to have esophageal perforations following anterior cervical spine surgery. Both cases were detected and treated in the acute postoperative period. One patient was successfully treated with primary repair and debridement. One patient underwent multiple debridement attempts and expired.

CONCLUSIONS: Esophageal perforation following anterior cervical spine surgery is a relatively rare occurrence. Prompt recognition and treatment of these injuries is critical to minimizing morbidity and mortality.

DOI10.1177/2192568216687535
Alternate JournalGlobal Spine J
PubMed ID28451488
PubMed Central IDPMC5400185