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A Multidisciplinary Team Approach to Brain and Spine Stereotactic Radiosurgery Conferences: A Unique Institutional Model.

TitleA Multidisciplinary Team Approach to Brain and Spine Stereotactic Radiosurgery Conferences: A Unique Institutional Model.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsChidambaram S, Winston GM, Knisely JPS, Ramakrishna R, Juthani R, Salah K, McKenna JT, Jozsef G, Cardona D, Pannullo SC
JournalWorld Neurosurg
Volume131
Pagination159-162
Date Published2019 Nov
ISSN1878-8769
KeywordsBrain, Communication, Humans, Models, Theoretical, Patient Care Team, Radiosurgery, Spine, Workflow
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The use of multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) comprised of all members of the patient care team is becoming increasingly popular in the field of oncology. We present a single-center experience exploring the utility and uniqueness of an MDT in the care of patients undergoing brain and spine stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS).

METHODS: The weekly SRS conference brought together neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, neuroradiologists, physicists, dosimetrists, therapists, advanced practice providers, and trainees in these fields as well as researchers from a variety of disciplines with a goal of optimizing patient care. A survey of 20 conference attendees from 7 different facets of the MDT was conducted for feedback.

RESULTS: The survey results revealed that most respondents believed the SRS conference increased educational opportunities, provided opportunities for research and collaborations, helped streamline patient care, and was beneficial to their practice.

CONCLUSIONS: We present our institutional MDT model, a framework and workflow that can be incorporated at other large academic centers. We believe that the SRS conference has educational, academic, and patient care value.

DOI10.1016/j.wneu.2019.08.012
Alternate JournalWorld Neurosurg
PubMed ID31408748