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Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with 3D-Navigation Guided Cortical Bone Trajectory Screws for L4/5 Degenerative Spondylolisthesis: 1-Year Clinical and Radiographic Outcomes.

TitlePosterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with 3D-Navigation Guided Cortical Bone Trajectory Screws for L4/5 Degenerative Spondylolisthesis: 1-Year Clinical and Radiographic Outcomes.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsHussain I, Virk MS, Link TW, Tsiouris AJ, Elowitz E
JournalWorld Neurosurg
Volume110
Paginatione504-e513
Date Published2018 Feb
ISSN1878-8769
KeywordsAged, Disability Evaluation, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Lumbar Vertebrae, Male, Middle Aged, Pain, Prospective Studies, Retrospective Studies, Spinal Fusion, Spondylolisthesis, Surgery, Computer-Assisted, Tomography, X-Ray Computed, Treatment Outcome
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We describe our technique and evaluate clinical and radiographic outcomes for patients undergoing L4/5 posterior lumbar interbody fusion with 3D-navigation guided cortical bone trajectory screws (PLIF-CBT) for grade 1 or 2 degenerative spondylolisthesis with a minimum follow-up time of 12 months.

METHODS: A single-institution series of 18 patients was evaluated with data prospectively collected and retrospectively analyzed. Pain and disability scores were collected preoperatively and at a minimum of 12 months postoperatively, including back and bilateral leg pain visual analog scores (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores. Radiographic fusion was assessed as complete, partial, or none based on the presence of bridging bones across the disc space, posterior elements, or both.

RESULTS: Patients demonstrated statistically significant reductions in back pain VAS (P = 0.0025), leg pain VAS (P < 0.0001), and ODI (P < 0.0001) at a minimum of 12 months postoperatively. Radiographic fusion at an average of 14.9 months postoperatively was available for 16/18 patients, with 6 patients demonstrating fusion (4/6 with complete fusion; 2/6 with partial fusion). There were no instances of intraoperative complications or delayed complications requiring subsequent interventions.

CONCLUSIONS: PLIF-CBT can be performed in a safe and reproducible fashion with excellent clinical outcomes at 1 year postoperatively. The outcomes did not correlate with fusion status, which was unexpectedly low at 37.5% without significant hardware abnormalities necessitating reoperations. PLIF-CBT offers several perioperative advantages compared with traditional open PLIF and requires longer-term studies to demonstrate its durability with regard to improvement in clinical pain and radiographic endpoints, including anterior and/or posterior element fusion.

DOI10.1016/j.wneu.2017.11.034
Alternate JournalWorld Neurosurg
PubMed ID29155112