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Ten-Step Minimally Invasive Cervical Decompression via Unilateral Tubular Laminotomy: Technical Note and Early Clinical Experience.

TitleTen-Step Minimally Invasive Cervical Decompression via Unilateral Tubular Laminotomy: Technical Note and Early Clinical Experience.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsHernandez RNick, Wipplinger C, Navarro-Ramirez R, Soriano-Solis S, Kirnaz S, Hussain I, Schmidt FAnna, Soriano-Sánchez J-A, Härtl R
JournalOper Neurosurg (Hagerstown)
Volume18
Issue3
Pagination284-294
Date Published2020 03 01
ISSN2332-4260
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Minimally invasive techniques utilizing tubular retractors have become an increasingly popular approach to the spinal column. The concept of a unilateral laminotomy for bilateral decompression (ULBD), first applied in the lumbar spine, has recently been applied to the cervical spine for the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). A better understanding of the indications and surgical techniques is required to effectively educate surgeons on how to appropriately and safely perform tubular cervical laminotomy via ULBD.

OBJECTIVE: To describe a 10-step technique for minimally invasive cervical laminotomy and report our early clinical experience.

METHODS: A retrospective review identified 15 patients with CSM who were treated with this procedure. Visual analogue scale (VAS), neck disability index (NDI), and modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scores were obtained pre- and postoperatively.

RESULTS: The mean age of the 15 patients was 73.1 ± 6.8 yr. The median number of levels treated was 1 (range 1-3). Mean operative time was 125.3 ± 30.8 or 81.7 ± 19.2 min per level. Mean estimated blood loss was 57.3 ± 24.6 cc. Median postoperative hospital length of stay was 36 h. No complications were encountered. Median follow-up was 18 mo. Mean pre- and postoperative VAS were 6.4 ± 2.4 and 1.0 ± 0.8, respectively (P < .001). Mean pre- and postoperative NDI were 46.4 ± 19.2 and 7.0 ± 6.9, respectively (P < .001). Mean pre- and postoperative Mjoa were 11.3 ± 2.5 and 14.5 ± 0.5, respectively (P < .001).

CONCLUSION: In our early clinical experience, minimally invasive cervical ULBD is safe and effective. Adherence to the presented 10-step technique will allow surgeons to safely address bilateral cervical pathology while avoiding complications.

DOI10.1093/ons/opz156
Alternate JournalOper Neurosurg (Hagerstown)
PubMed ID31245806