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Treatment patterns and outcomes among women with brain metastases from gynecologic malignancies.

TitleTreatment patterns and outcomes among women with brain metastases from gynecologic malignancies.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsCagino K, Kahn R, Pannullo S, Ashamalla H, Chan S, Balogun O, Thomas C, Christos PJ, Holcomb K, Frey MK, Chapman-Davis E
JournalGynecol Oncol Rep
Volume34
Pagination100664
Date Published2020 Nov
ISSN2352-5789
Abstract

Background: Brain metastasis secondary to gynecologic malignancy is rare and has no definitive management guidelines. In this descriptive study, we aimed to identify prognostic factors and treatments that may be associated with longer overall survival.

Methods: Patients with brain metastases from gynecologic malignancies were identified between 2004 and 2019 at two institutions. Descriptive statistics were performed using N (%) and median (interquartile range). Univariate cox proportional hazards regression was performed to evaluate the effect of different factors on overall survival.

Results: 32 patients presented with brain metastasis from gynecologic primaries (ovarian/fallopian tube/primary peritoneal n = 14, uterine n = 11, cervical n = 7). Median age of initial cancer diagnosis was 61 (34-79). At initial cancer diagnosis 83% of patients were Stage III/IV and underwent surgery (66%), chemotherapy (100%), and/or pelvic radiation (33%). Median time from initial cancer diagnosis to brain metastasis was 18 months. Treatment of brain metastasis with surgery and radiation compared to stereotactic radiosurgery or whole brain radiation therapy alone revealed a trend toward longer overall survival (p = 0.07). Time from initial cancer diagnosis to brain metastasis was associated with longer overall survival with each one-month increase from initial cancer diagnosis associated with a 7% reduction in risk of death (HR 0.93, 95% CI = 0.89-0.97, p = 0.01). Initial cancer treatment, stage, histology, and number of brain lesions did not affect overall survival.

Conclusions: Patients with brain metastasis secondary to gynecologic malignancies with the longest overall survival had the greatest lag time between initial cancer diagnosis and brain metastasis. Brain metastasis treated with surgery and radiation was associated with longer overall survival.

DOI10.1016/j.gore.2020.100664
Alternate JournalGynecol Oncol Rep
PubMed ID33204795
PubMed Central IDPMC7649617
Grant ListUL1 TR002384 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States