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Use of Bivector Traction for Stabilization of the Head and Maintenance of Optimal Cervical Alignment in Posterior Cervical Fusions.

TitleUse of Bivector Traction for Stabilization of the Head and Maintenance of Optimal Cervical Alignment in Posterior Cervical Fusions.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsKarikari IO, Bumpass DB, Gum J, Sugrue P, Chapman TM, Elsamadicy AA, K Riew D
JournalGlobal Spine J
Volume7
Issue3
Pagination227-229
Date Published2017 May
ISSN2192-5682
Abstract

STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of consecutive case series.

OBJECTIVE: To introduce a novel method of stabilizing the cranium using bivector traction in posterior cervical fusions.

METHODS: A retrospective review of 50 consecutive patients undergoing instrumented posterior cervical arthrodesis was performed. All patients had at least 3 levels of subaxial fusion using the bivector traction apparatus. Patients' demographic data was recorded for the following: pre- and postoperative cervical lordosis, pre- and postoperative cervical sagittal vertical alignment (cSVA), and intraoperative complications from pin placements.

RESULTS: A total of 50 patients were studied. There were 31 females and 19 males. The mean age at the time of surgery was 49 years (range 35-79). A mean 5.8 levels were fused. The most common levels fused were C2-T3 in 14 patients followed by C2-T2 in 7 patients. In no case did the surgeon or assistant have to scrub out to adjust the alignment. The mean pre- and postoperative cervical lordosis was -6.0° and -10°, respectively ( = .04). The mean pre-and postoperative cSVA was 30.5 mm and 32 mm, respectively ( = .6). There were no complications related to placement of the Gardner-Well tongs.

CONCLUSION: The bivector traction is an easy, safe, and effective method of stabilizing the head and obtaining adequate cervical sagittal alignment.

DOI10.1177/2192568217694146
Alternate JournalGlobal Spine J
PubMed ID28660104
PubMed Central IDPMC5476351