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Worldwide Steroid Prescription for Acute Spinal Cord Injury.

TitleWorldwide Steroid Prescription for Acute Spinal Cord Injury.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsFalavigna A, Quadros FW, Teles AR, Wong CChek, Barbagallo G, Brodke D, Al-Mutair A, K Riew D
JournalGlobal Spine J
Volume8
Issue3
Pagination303-310
Date Published2018 May
ISSN2192-5682
Abstract

Study Design: Cross-sectional study.

Objectives: To continue the line of a previous publication using steroid for acute spinal cord injury (SCI) by spine surgeons from Latin America (LA) and assess the current status of methylprednisolone (MP) prescription in Europe (EU), Asia Pacific (AP), North America (NA), and Middle East (ME) to determine targets for educational activities suitable for each region.

Methods: The English version of a previously published questionnaire was used to evaluate opinions about MP administration in acute SCI in LA, EU, AP, NA, and ME. This Internet-based survey was conducted by members of AOSpine. The questionnaire asked about demographic features, background with management of spine trauma patients, routine administration of MP in acute SCI, and reasons for MP administration.

Results: A total of 2659 responses were obtained for the electronic questionnaire from LA, EU, AP, NA, and ME. The number of spine surgeons that treat SCI was 2206 (83%). The steroid was used by 1198 (52.9%) surgeons. The uses of MP were based predominantly on the National Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study III study (n = 595, 50%). The answers were most frequently given by spine surgeons from AP, ME, and LA. These regions presented a statistically significant difference from North America ( < .001). The number of SCI patients treated per year inversely influenced the use of MP. The higher the number of patients treated, the lower the administration rates of MP observed.

Conclusions: The study identified potential targets for educational campaigns, aiming to reduce inappropriate practices of MP administration.

DOI10.1177/2192568217735804
Alternate JournalGlobal Spine J
PubMed ID29796379
PubMed Central IDPMC5958488